Penn State Penn State: College of the Liberal Arts

Courses

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Courses

Now you can choose your courses based on your interests! The Spanish faculty are now designating the courses they offer within these four themes so that you can zoom in on the topics that interest you the most. Click on the picture of your choice below to see the courses that cover topics related to each theme.

SPAN 100 – Intermediate Grammar and Composition (3 credits)

Course Description: An intermediate level grammar review that also incorporates directed and original composition exercises.
Prerequisite: SPAN 003 or placement

SPAN 100A – Intermediate Grammar and Composition for Spanish Bilinguals (3 credits)

Course Description: A review of grammar and practice with composition focusing on needs and problems specific to Spanish-speaking bilinguals.
Prerequisite: Placement

SPAN 100B – Intermediate Grammar and Composition for Students in Medical-Related Fields (3 credits)

Course Description: Intermediate Grammar and Composition for Students in Medical-Related Fields. The main goals of the course are to help students develop their competence in using medical terminology in Spanish and to become familiar with the cultural aspects in the health care of Latinos/Hispanics in the United States. In addition, the course will review intermediate level Spanish-language grammar and will provide structure to improve students receptive (listening and reading) and productive (speaking and writing) skills needed for this specialized vocabulary. During the semester students will learn and practice health terminology in Spanish, and they will apply the specialized vocabulary through case scenarios, noticias (news) and readings. Participants will be exposed to Spanish from the first day and are expected to stay up-to date with the current health news as it relates to the Hispanic/Latino population of the United States. The course is intended for those who are beyond the basic level of Spanish (must have taken Span 003), but participants are not expected to be fluent speakers.
Prerequisite: SPAN 003

SPAN 100C – Intermediate Grammar and Composition for Students in Communication-related Fields (3 credits)

Course Description: This course focused on grammar and the media environment replaces Spanish 100 for students going into Communication majors. Intermediate Grammar and Composition for Students in Communication-related fields (Spanish in the Media) is an online content-based course for Spanish majors aimed to develop communication skills through a focus on mass media in Hispanic culture. This online course is a perfect match for double majors in Spanish and Media (Advertising/Public Relations, Media Studies, Journalism, etc). This course is restricted to students who are Communication majors or pre-majors. Completing this course achieves 15th credit level proficiency and replaces SPAN 100.
Prerequisite: SPAN 003 or placement

SPAN 100H – Intermediate Grammar and Composition (3 credits)

Course Description: An intermediate level grammar review that also incorporates directed and original composition exercises.
Prerequisite: None

SPAN 105 – Elementary Spanish I for Students in the Agricultural Sciences (4 credits)

Course Description: The course covers basic Spanish, grammar, and oral, aural, and writing skills for students in the Agricultural Sciences. Students who have received high school credit for two or more years of Spanish may not schedule this course for credit without the permission of the instructor. This course does not count toward Spanish majors or the Spanish minor. This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. The class will focus on the development of basic language skills, socio-cultural awareness and discourse. The class periods will be used to develop: (1) the student’s knowledge of Spanish as a linguistic code through mastery of a personalized vocabulary as well as common idiomatic language structures important to the student’s ability to communicate with Spanish speakers employed in their area of agricultural interest; (2) the student’s understanding of major grammatical concepts critical to effective communication in work management within the food, agriculture and natural resources industries; (3) the student’s cultural awareness of the varied Spanish speaking cultures with which the student will come into contact in the workplace; and (4) the student’s ability to be creative with their knowledge of the language as it relates to the development of self-confidence and effective communicative proficiency in Spanish. Frequent short quizzes and the collection and grading of are important components of the course as they are used to encourage the use of Spanish on a daily basis. Classroom activities will be designed to require students to use and develop their communication skills in Spanish to communicate efficiently and relate personally to Spanish speakers. Students will be evaluated based on homework, quizzes, exams, and class participation. Students who have received high school credit for four years of Spanish may not schedule this course for credit, without the permission of the instructor. This course does not count toward Spanish majors or the Spanish minor.
Prerequisite: None

SPAN 106 – Elementary Spanish II for Students in the Agricultural Sciences (4 credits)

Course Description: Further development of basic Spanish skills and the cultural awareness needed to work with Spanish speakers in the agricultural industries. The class will focus on further development of the elementary language skills, socio-cultural awareness and discourse introduced in SPAN 105. It will also build on the agricultural concepts introduced in Spanish 105. The class periods will be used to develop further: (1) the student’s knowledge of Spanish as a linguistic code through further mastery of a personalized vocabulary as well as common idiomatic language structures important to the student’s ability to communicate with Spanish speakers employed in their area of agricultural interest; (2) the student’s understanding of major grammatical concepts critical to effective communication in work management within the food, agriculture and natural resources industries; (3) the student’s cultural awareness of the varied Spanish speaking cultures with which the student will come into contact in the workplace; and (4) the student’s ability to be creative with their knowledge of the language as it relates to the development of self-confidence and effective communicative proficiency in Spanish. Frequent short quizzes and the collection and grading homework assignments are important components of the course as they are used to encourage the use of Spanish on a daily basis. Classroom activities will be designed to require students to use and develop their communication skills in Spanish to communicate efficiently and relate personally to Spanish speakers. Students will be evaluated based on homework, quizzes, exams, and class participation. Students who have received high school credit for four years of Spanish may not schedule this course for credit, without the permission of the instructor. This course does not count toward Spanish majors or the Spanish minor.
Prerequisite: SPAN 105

SPAN 130 – Iberian Civilization (3 credits)

Course Description: Spanish 130 is a general education course on Iberian culture and civilization. The goal of this course is to provide the student with a broad, general introduction to the lands, peoples, history, and cultures of the area known as Spain and Portugal; to inform the student about the region¿s ethnic diversity, cultural heritages, and problems of development; to investigate vital symbols, myths, figures, icons, superstitions, and faiths; to foster critical thinking and associative skills; to suggest continuity and draw parallels between past and present; and to allow for a framework for undertaking further study. This course will survey the civilizations of these European lands and we will get an overview of the main historical events that make up this rich and complex history.The course is designed to expose students to the full range of Iberian history and diversity. Since we are covering centuries of history and several other variables (linguistic, artistic, ethnic, religious, political, economic, geographic, biologic, etc.), this tour will of necessity be pretty rudimentary. However, students will acquire an understanding of the diverse cultural currents and historical milestones that contributed to the creation of modern Spain and Portugal.
Prerequisite: None

SPAN 131 – Ibero-American Civilization (3 credits)

Course Description: Spanish American and Brazilian life from the Conquest to the present; including studies of literature, art, the indigenous heritage, and contemporary problems. This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements.The nations and peoples of Latin America have a unique, interesting history and cultural heritage that are rooted in the traditions, beliefs, experiences, values, and struggles of Native American, European, African and other populations. As close neighbors and major trading partners of the United States, Latin American republics have both benefited and suffered from the proximity and foreign policies of the northern capitalist democracy, and have contributed to its strength and growing ethno-racial diversity. This course aims to provide the student with a broad, general introduction to the lands, peoples, and history of Latin America; to inform the student about the region’s ethnic diversity, cultural background, and problems of development; and to promote appreciation for the values and practices of other cultures, and a better understanding of relations between the nations of the region and the United States. Traditional resident classes will usually combine presentation of content and discussion of reading assignments, with an expectation of high student participation. Films, videos, and recordings will enhance and illustrate readings. This course will fulfill the Humanities Breadth and Cultural Diversity requirements. The course does not count toward credits in the major or minor in Spanish because it is taught in English. Nevertheless, it will complement the department’s offerings by providing students with a greater appreciation of Latin America’s cultural origins, socioeconomic development, and everyday realities.
Prerequisite: None

SPAN 131Y – Ibero-American Civilization (3 credits)

Course Description: Spanish American and Brazilian life from the Conquest to the present; literature, art, the indigenous heritage, and contemporary problems. The nations and peoples of Latin America have a unique, interesting history and cultural heritage that are rooted in the traditions, beliefs, experiences, values, and struggles of Native American, European, African and other populations. As close neighbors and major trading partners of the United States, Latin American republics have both benefited and suffered from the proximity and foreign policies of the northern capitalist democracy, and have contributed to its strength and growing ethno-racial diversity. This course aims to provide the student with a broad, general introduction to the lands, peoples, and history of Latin America; to inform the student about the region’s ethnic diversity, cultural background, and problems of development; and to promote appreciation for the values and practices of other cultures, and a better understanding of relations between the nations of the region and the United States. Classes will usually combine lecture and discussion of reading assignments, with an expectation of high student participation. Films, videos, and recordings will enhance and illustrate readings. Three examinations (each covering approximately one third of the lessons presented), an occasional quiz, a book report or an annotated bibliography, participation and attendance will be the basis for evaluation of student learning and grades. Students are required and expected to read assignments, to attend class regularly, and to be prepared to participate in class discussions by answering and raising questions relevant to the lessons. Poor attendance will adversely affect a students standing and grade. This course will fulfill the Humanities Breadth and Cultural Diversity requirements. The course does not count toward credits in the major or minor in Spanish because it is taught in English. Nevertheless, it will complement the department’s offerings by providing students with a greater appreciation of Latin America’s cultural origins, socioeconomic development, and everyday realities.
Prerequisite: None

SPAN 132 – Afro-Hispanic Civilization (3 credits)

Course Description: A general introduction to human and cultural elements of African origin in Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking countries of Latin America. This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. The nations and peoples of Latin America have a unique, interesting history and cultural heritage that are rooted in the traditions, beliefs, experiences, values, and struggles of Native American, European, African and other populations. This course focuses on the presence and participation of African peoples and their descendants in the formation and development of societies and cultures in representative areas of the Caribbean, South America, and CentralAmerica and on the evolution, diversity, and richness of the African heritage therein. Course content includes the African background, the experience and impact of slavery, the social, cultural, and economic heritage of slavery, the role of race in Latin America, and Afro-Hispanic intellectual, literary, and artistic developments (e.g., aspects of folklore, music). The course aims to provide students with a general introduction to human and cultural elements ofAfrican origin within the Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking nations of theAmericas so that they may be more knowledgeable of the meaning, significance and widespread influence of the African diaspora. It proposes to provide the student with a better understanding of Africa’s contribution to Latin American identity, diversity, culture, and development; to promote appreciation for the values and practices of other cultures, and greater awareness of the relations between the nations of the region and the United States.
Prerequisite: None

SPAN 197A – Costa Rica: Pura Vida

Course Description: This course will prepare you to undertake travel to Costa Rica as a respectable representative of the United States and Penn State Altoona as well as a willing student of Spanish and international culture. Students will be fully engaged in Costa Rica culture in a very up-close and personal way, utilizing their Spanish skills in an engaging fashion on a daily basis. Excursion to Costa Rica will take place May 17-25. 

SPAN 197A/NURS 197A – Conversational Spanish for Health Care Providers

Course Description: A conversational Spanish speaking course designed to prepare students interested in a health care field to communicate with Spanish speaking patients. 

SPAN 200 – Intensive Grammar and Composition (3 credits)

Course Description: Intensive grammar review; composition. Designed primarily for majors and prospective majors.
Prerequisite: SPAN 100 or by placement

SPAN 210 – Readings in Iberian Civilization (3 credits)

Course Description: Intermediate level Spanish readings dealing with Iberian life from pre-historic times to the present.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200

SPAN 215 – Introduction to Spanish Linguistics (3 credits)

Course Description: Introduction to the fundamental components of linguistics using data from the Spanish language. Spanish 215 will introduce students to the fundamental components of linguistics (phonology, morphology, syntax, lexicon, and semantics) using data from the Spanish language. The course requires no previous knowledge of linguistics, but presupposes familiarity with Spanish at the 15 credit level or higher. The underlying purpose is to awaken the student’s interest in Spanish linguistics; to provide them with a foundation in the terminology and concepts necessary for studying higher level courses that are part of Spanish major and minor curricula; and to help them to decide which of the upper level classes they would be most interested in taking. Student performance in the course will be evaluated by (a) exams designed to verify their familiarity and understanding of linguistic terminology and concepts, their skill in doing phonetic transcription, and their ability to solve problems in phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics, and (b) their preparedness and participation in classroom activities.
Prerequisite: SPAN 100

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SPAN 220 – Readings in Ibero-American Civilization (3 credits)

Course Description: Intermediate level Spanish readings dealing with Ibero-American life from the pre-conquest to the present.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200

SPAN 230 – Masterpieces of Spanish Literature in English Translation (3 credits)

Course Description: Study of works and authors of international importance; lectures, readings, and written works in English.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200

SPAN 253W – Introduction to Hispanic Literature (3 credits)

Course Description: Introduction to generic distinctions, critical methods, and approaches to Hispanic literature. This course meets the Bachelor of Arts degree requirements. During the semester students will learn how to write, and will practice writing, critical and analytical essays based upon the different genres of literature studied in class. All students will write three compositions during the semester, which will be written twice incorporating in the final draft suggestions made by their peer editors and by their instructor. The writing of the second version will be preceded by a conference with the instructor in which s/he will make comments and suggestions to the students about how to avoid the same errors made in the first draft. The themes for all papers must be chosen in consultation with the professor.
Prerequisite: SPAN 100 and SPAN 110

SPAN 297 – Introduction to Latin American Visual Culture

Instructor: Marco A. Martínez
Course Description: Photographs, cartoons, graffiti, movies, cartels, graphic novels, advertisement, music videos, magazines, blogs, are some of the manifestations of the contemporary visual word. This course offers an introduction to the Latin American visual culture in its nearly infinite manifestations. Through careful looking, reading, writing, and discussions, students will be encouraged to think the visual word in the construction of the historical, political, social and subjective dimensions from the end of the 19th century to our times. Among the issues to be examined are: the function, production, and consumption of visual images in different cultures; the foreign gaze; war and propaganda (Mexican Revolution and the Spanish Civil War), the margins of the city; sexuality and abjection; political power; and death and memory.

SPAN 297 – Multilingual and Intercultural Communication

Time: TR, 12:05-1:20 p.m.
Instructor: Lauren Halberstadt
Course Description: The Multilingual and Intercultural Communication (MIC) course focuses on linguistic strategies for succeeding in multilingual environments (e.g. dialect variation, second language acquisition strategies) as well as intercultural communication practices for navigating new environments (e.g. understanding cultural norms, skills for global leadership). The course will have an interdisciplinary focus on social science and the humanities. The mission of the course is to develop transferable skills, expand professional opportunities, and enhance intercultural communication in our students.
Learning objectives:
Develop and enhance intercultural communication skills
Improve language and language learning skills
Provide an understanding of global professional experiences in a range of fields through global leadership assignments
Give Spanish-, Italian-, and Portuguese-learning students opportunities to practice their languages as well as cooperate with each other to navigate cultures in languages which they do not yet speak
Teach students strategies for successful intercultural communication and global competency
Instill confidence in students to participate in international experiences, during their education and afterward in their careers
Prerequisite: SPAN 100

SPAN 297 – Spanish in the Digital Age: Culture, Language, and New Technologies

Instructor: Alejandro Ramírez-Arballo
Course Description: This course provides an opportunity to enhance acquisition of the fundamental elements of the Spanish language. Reading, writing and speaking skills are polished as students build on knowledge of the target culture through research, discussion and projects using the latest technology.

SPAN 297A – Spanish Through Art

Course Description: Spanish language and culture at the advanced level through art from Spain and Latin America. Review of the artists’ biographies and their works in light of the historical moment, significance, and culture. 

SPAN 297B – Introduction to Latin America Visual Culture

Course Description: Photographs, cartoons, graffiti, movies, cartels, blogs, advertisement, music videos, newspaper, underground magazines, blogs, are some of the manifestations of the contemporary visual word. This course offers an introduction to the Latin American visual culture in its nearly infinite manifestations.
Prerequisite: SPAN 100

SPAN 300 – Advanced Grammar and Composition Through Reading (3 credits)

Course Description: Development of advanced grammar and composition skills through reading texts by native speakers and adapting their techniques for original compositions.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200

SPAN 300B* – Advanced Grammar and Composition for Students in Medical-Related Fields (3 credits)

Course Description: Advanced Grammar and Composition for Students in Medical-related Fields.
Prerequisite: SPAN 100B
*Note: Students may take either SPAN 300 OR SPAN 300B but not both

SPAN 301 – Advanced Writing and Stylistics in Spanish for Spanish (3 credits)

Course Description: This course will enhance writing proficiency in Spanish of Spanish speaking students by targeting common problems characteristic of Spanish speakers.
Prerequisite: SPAN 100A

SPAN 305 – Spanish for Social Services (3 credits)

Course Description: Provides practical language applications for students going to social work, psychology, and the legal and medical professions. SPAN 305 Spanish for Social Services (3) provides practical language applications for students going into social work, psychology, and the legal and medical professions. At the same time, there is an emphasis on the wide range of historic, linguistic and cultural influences that make up the Hispanic community in the US today.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200 and SPAN 215 or SPAN 253W

SPAN 310 – Business Spanish (3 credits)

SPAN 314 – Spanish Sounds (3 credits)

Course Description: Spanish phonetics and phonemics; systematic means of correcting pronunciation defects; other audio-lingual applications.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200, SPAN 215

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SPAN 316 – Building Words and Sentences in Spanish (3 credits)

Course Description: Building words and sentences in Spanish. Analysis of Spanish work structure and its relationship to syntactic structures. SPAN 316 is an introduction to the study of Spanish morphology and syntax. In linguistics, morphology is the study of the morphemes (e.g. affixes, words, roots) of language and how they combine together to form words. Syntax is the study of how words combine together to form phrases and sentences. Because this course is for Spanish majors and minors, the focus in this course is on the structure of words, phrases, and sentences in Spanish, how Spanish compares to other languages, and how morphology and syntax vary across Spanish dialects. Special focus will be made on explaining the kinds of errors typical of English-speaking learners of Spanish as a second language, and a primary goal of the course is for students to improve their proficiency in using Spanish morphosyntax. The course is taught in Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200, SPAN 215

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SPAN 326 – Reading the Border/Lands (3 credits)

Course Description: This course examines representations of the U.S.-Mexico border in relation to the actual geographic space. SPAN 326 centers on discussions of the U.S.-Mexico borderlands in cultural theory and practice. “Borderlands” is understood as a transcultural space filled with physical, cultural, economic, political, and mythical elements. The aim is to view how different artists from the Borderlands, both northern Mexican and Chicano, mediate their borderlands reality. That is to say, the goal of the class is to examine the different “imaginative geographies” in the borderlands. We examine a wide-ranging mix of cultural texts that includes prose, poetry, essays, and performance art, as well as film and video art. We explore how writers have historically rethought notions of citizenship, identity, and culture to create more fluid spaces of representation in cultural contact zones. We will in particular, pay close attention to the relationship between national geography and the shaping of regional identities and popular cultures between the maps that nations draw and the cultural forms that cut across them.
Prerequisite: None

SPAN 353 – Topics in the Cultures of Spain (3 credits)

Course Description: This course offers a comparative study of the literature, artistic manifestations, intellectual traditions, and cultural productions of Spain. This course offers a comparative study of the literature, artistic manifestations, intellectual traditions, and cultural productions of Spain. Depending on the semester focus, topics related to literary movements, comparative approaches to genre, and/or connections between textual representation and politics, social movements, and/or Spain’s long and complex history (both locally and globally) may be at the center of discussion. Additionally, varied issues of gender, race and ethnicity, rural and urban environments, religion, and evolving conceptions of nationhood may be included as overarching themes. Particular literary genres and representative works may be foregrounded in yet another iteration of the course, wherein students will study and discuss principal readings against cultural backdrops framed by exposure to art, film, music, and/or other historical, intellectual, sociopolitical, and/or media-based materials of relevance to the semester-specific context at hand.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200 and SPAN 253W

SPAN 354 – Topics in Border Studies (3 credits)

Course Description: This course offers a study of borders as key sites of contact, exchange, conflict, hybridity, and identity production in and across varied contexts of Spanish, Latin American, and/or Latina/o culture(s). This course offers a study of borders – geopolitical, social, intellectual, literary, artistic, and/or historical – as key sites of contact, exchange, conflict, hybridity, and identity production in and across varied contexts of Spanish, Latin American, and/or Latina/o culture(s). While diverse variables (including diaspora, gender, race and ethnicity, sexuality, colonialism, nationhood and transnationalism) will inform particular iterations of the course, approaches and text selection will be shaped by an understanding of borders as constructs defined by conditions of dynamic interaction and transformation. Materials to be considered in the course, which will vary according the focus, may include literary, artistic, and intellectual works, film, media-based texts, music, and/or historical documents.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200 and SPAN 253W

SPAN 355 – Topics in the Cultures of Latin America (3 credits)

Course Description: This course offers a comparative study of the literatures, artistic manifestations, intellectual traditions, and cultural productions of the Latin American region. This course offers a comparative study of the literatures, artistic manifestations, intellectual traditions, and cultural productions of the Latin American region. Throughout the course, we will reflect on the (im)possibility of characterizing a vast region by taking into account ongoing factors its broader history and culture, as well as national and local particularities. Topics will vary by semester and may include: literary and artistic periods and movements, (post)coloniality and decoloniality, the politics of race, gender, and sexuality, urban and rural sociopolitical movements, (self-)representations in old and new media, discourses of the political (populisms, revolutions, dictatorships, and neoliberalism), and migration studies. Students will engage with literary texts, historic documents, art, music, and other materials in order to understand different kinds of writing and forms of representation. While most materials will be in Spanish, the course may also include works in translation from Brazil, as well as the English- and/or French-speaking Caribbean.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200 and SPAN 253W

SPAN 356 Topics in the Cultures of the Americas (3 credits)

Course Description: This course offers a comparative study of the literatures and cultures of the Americas, bringing Latin America into dialogue with the United States (and in some instances Canada). This course offers a comparative study of the literatures and cultures of the Americas, bringing Latin America into dialogue with the United States (and, in some instances, Canada). Throughout the course, we will explore the (dis) continuities that both connect and divide the hemisphere, and we will trace the movement of people, artistic practices, and ideas across borders while paying attention to the distinctive aspects of national and local cultures. Topics will vary by semester and may include: empire and colonialism, the literary and cultural legacies of slavery, the figure of the “native,” crime literature or science fiction in the Americas, theater of the Americas, literatures and cultures of the Spanish-American War, media and the U.S./Mexico border, and cultures of the Caribbean diaspora. Although the course may cover English-language materials, or works in translation from Brazil and/or the French-speaking Caribbean, most of the texts/recordings/films will be in Spanish, as will all assignments written by students.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200 and SPAN 253W

SPAN 397 – Modern Spanish Short Story

Course Description: This course will examine the genre of the Spanish short story from the mid-nineteenth century through the post-Franco years of the Transition to democracy and beyond, focusing on such topics as: an evolving aesthetics of “the real,” the mechanics/stylistics of short narrative fiction in the Peninsular context, voices and perspectives from Spain’s cultural margins, conceptions of national identity, the metafictional mode, the subgenre of the fantastic, and a longstanding tradition of humor and social critique.

SPAN 410 – Advanced Oral Expression and Communication (3 credits)

Course Description: Emphasis on achieving practical command of spoken Spanish and the comprehension of native speech. Use of journalistic materials.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200

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SPAN 412 – Translation (3 credits)

Course Description: Techniques of written translation from Spanish to English and vice versa, particularly for business, literature, and social work. Students will learn translation theory and best practices, as well as strategies for overcoming the most common translation problems in Spanish-English translation. Some time will be spent on a review of grammar issues that most commonly result in errors in translation. Students will also learn how to deal with colloquial language and cultural references in a Spanish source text, and will be taught to consider the function of dialect, style and register in a source text and their impact in translation. In the final weeks of the semester, the focus shifts from the theoretical to the practical, as students apply their skills to the translation in advertising, scientific and technical texts, documents, and literary and artistic translation.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200

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SPAN 413 – Interpretation (3 credits)

Course Description: Introduction to the art of interpretation, with particular attention to the professions for which it is most commonly required. Spanish 413 will provide students with demonstrations and exercises designed to develop the skills required in sight translation and in consecutive, simultaneous and summary interpretation. The course does not presume to provide the training needed for entrance into the profession; it is intended to give students sufficient understanding of the rigors and demands of the profession and to help them determine whether they have the interest and skills to pursue further training in this area. At the same time, it will provide students with a unique opportunity to improve their listening comprehension and fluency in the target language, whether English or Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 412

SPAN 417 – How Languages Are Learned (3 credits)

Course Description: This class is a linguistics course that focuses on language acquisition in children and adults. Linguistics is the scientific study of language and its structure, and linguistic inquiry focuses on various levels of language: phonology examines the sounds of language, morphology examines the structure of words (e.g., root words and their inflections), and syntax focuses on the structure of phrases and sentences. Using the tools of phonology, morphology, and syntax, this course will address the following questions. What is unique about human language? How is language learned in infancy? How do humans learn additional languages after they have learned their first language? How does bilingual language development compare to monolingual language development? Can knowing more than one language actually be detrimental? What are the different languages spoken by bilinguals in the Spanish-speaking world? What sorts of bilingual education programs are there in the Spanish-speaking world, including in the U.S.? By answering these questions, this course introduces students to bilingualism and bilingual language acquisition.
Prerequisite: SPAN 215 

SPAN 418 – The Evolution of Spanish (3 credits)

Course Description: The emergence and development of the sounds and forms of Spanish.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200 and SPAN 215

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SPAN 420 – Spanish for Business and International Trade (3 credits)

Course Description: Spanish 420, Spanish for Business and International Trade, is an introduction to business administration (organizational structure, human resources, marketing, accounting, cross-cultural etiquette, business ethics, etc.) within the context of the Spanish language and Hispanic cultures against the backdrop of the global economy. Participants will broaden and deepen their ability to apply their Spanish skills in a professional setting by reading and evaluating current business articles, discussing and analyzing business issues in various Hispanic countries, examining the intersection of business and culture in the Spanish-speaking world, viewing short videos, preparing a resume in Spanish, and participating in other written and oral activities. To complement the core content, various assignments also allow students to focus on their individual majors.
Prerequisite: SPAN 100A or SPAN 200 and SPAN 215 or SPAN 253

SPAN 439 – Don Quijote (3 credits)

Course Description: Thorough study of the masterpiece, including its sources, genesis, language, style, success, and influence.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 470 – Youth Cultures in Latin(a/o) America (3 credits)

Course Description: Young people have been at the center of political and cultural revolutions around the world and throughout history. For example, revolutions, urban movements, ethnic/racial pride, LGBTQ+, feminist movements, music basaars, DJs and rave parties, and “barras de futbol” are only some of the manifestations associated with young people in Latin(a/o) American literature, film, music, and journalism. Nevertheless, the concept of “youth” as an academic category only appeared in the 1960’s. In this course, we will study different manifestations of youth cultures in the Hemispheric Americas, paying special attention to the Latinx communities in the U.S. and Latin America, since the 1960’s and until the contemporary moment. The key question that will guide us is: How does each of these literary, artistic, and media representations of youth enter into dialogue with political events in which young people have been at the center of efforts to bring about political changes in the U.S. Latinx communities and Latin American? Using short fiction, film and documentaries, songs, blogs, and other cultural materials (YouTube clips, images, graffiti, etc.), we will identify and compare different youth cultures in Latinx communities in the U.S. and Latin America in terms of their productions, representations, and effects in the public sphere. We will enrich our analysis of primary materials with theoretical and critical readings that will help us to contextualize the different manifestations in our study.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 472 – The Contemporary Spanish American Novel (3 credits)

Course Description: The regionalist and social novel since 1910, together with the social background.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 474 – Many Mexicos (3 credits)

Course Description: Overview of Mexican literature, culture and history from pre-colonial period to present.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 476 – Masterpieces of Spanish American Literature (3 credits)

Course Description: Reading, analysis, and discussion of selected major works representative of Spanish American prose and poetry.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 479 – U.S. Latina/o Culture en Español (3 credits)

Course Description: This course is conducted in Spanish and will analyze some of the central themes that shape the diverse Latina/o experiences in the United States. Some of the main topics that the course will address include: the politics of labeling; definitions of displacements; the politics of language; imaginary homelands and geographic spaces; and conceptualizations of race, gender, and sexuality. These themes will be seen through the lens of Latina/o literature and film. The main objective of this course is to help students think critically about the conceptual, theoretical, historical, and social issues that inform the Latina/o experience in the United States.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 488 – War, Revolution, and the Struggles for Modernity: Spain 1898-1939 (3 credits)

Course Description: This course, conducted in Spanish, examines Spanish literature from 1898 to 1939.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 490 – Masterpieces of Spanish Prose (3 credits)

Course Description: Reading, analysis, and discussion of selected masterpieces of Spanish novels, short stories, etc.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 491 – Masterpieces of Spanish Drama and Poetry (3 credits)

Course Description: Reading, analysis, and discussion of selected masterpieces of Spanish drama and poetry.
Prerequisite: None

SPAN 496A – Bilingualism and Second Language

Course Description: Research on bilingualism and second language use through reading background literature and developing experimental stimuli and designs. 

SPAN 496A – Spanish in Technical Fields

Course Description: Study of words and phrases unique to petroleum engineering. Study of grammar including technical and research semantics and grammatical structure. Also, additional cultural component as student examines the how the presence of a pipeline industry has affected the local and national culture in Mexico. 

SPAN 497 – A Thousand Faces

Instructor: María Izquierdo
Course Description: In this course, we will develop our capacity to observe our surroundings in new ways and use the written word to manipulate different types of readers. We will also consider the introduction of images, gifs, and videos into the production of some of the stories that we will create. We will write stories as short as 140 characters, participating in Twiteratura, and as long as 6 pages. Topics discussed may be controversial, absurd, or sensitive in nature, and we will learn to navigate them while offering and receiving constructive criticism in a respectful manner.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 497 – Being Bilingual in a Monolingual World

Instructor: Mike Johns
Course Description: Linguistic scholar Francois Grosjean once famously wrote that “the bilingual is not two monolinguals in one person”. But what does this mean, and what does it imply? This question will be at the center of the course, divided into three broad sections: the language science of bilingualism, where students will be introduced to recent topics on bilingual research; the social aspects of bilingualism, which focuses on the cultural and political discussions surrounding bilingualism; and the cognitive ramifications of bilingualism, centered around the “bilingual advantage”. Students will read articles and participate in class discussions, participate in a class debate on the “bilingual advantage”, and complete a final project on a topic of their choosing. The goal of this course is to broaden students’ understanding of the science of bilingualism and further their critical thinking and argumentation skills.

SPAN 497 – Bi(lingual) Curiosity: Identity and Language in the Spanish-speaking world

Time: MWF, 12:20-1:10 p.m.
Instructor: Ashley Pahis
Course Description: This course explores the many ways in which we as language users construct, maintain, and express ourselves through language both orally and physically. We as humans possess similar means by which to produce language. How, then, do we manipulate the ways in which we speak and act to express ourselves and make our voices heard? We will discuss topics such as the performative aspects of gender and the acoustic manifestations of sex, gender, and sexuality in Spanish and other languages, as well as more recent movements striving for more inclusive language.
Prerequisite: SPAN 215

SPAN 497 – Bilingualism in the U.S.: Acquisition, Cognition, & Community

Instructor: Dora LaCasse
Course Description: This course will focus on the study of bilingualism in the United States. We’ll discover how bilinguals acquire their languages, how they manage their two languages, and how they use them, as members of bilingual communities. We will take a cross-disciplinary view, exploring major questions from both corpus-based and laboratory approaches.
Prerequisite: SPAN 215

SPAN 497 – Don Quijote and Errant Subjects in a Global Context

Instructor: Elizabeth Lagresa-González
Course Description: This course examines Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra’s masterpiece Don Quijote de la Mancha, focusing on close readings and literary analysis of major themes such as reality/fiction, perspectivism/ ambiguity, and deeds/words, covering a range of topics from  gender and race relations to economic crises, religious turmoil and social inequality. Special emphasis will be placed on examining the representation of “others,” within the context of the expulsion of Jewish and Moorish minorities. The course will consider “errant” subjects in its two dimensions: as those straying from the accepted course, unacceptable actions; and traveling in search of adventure, a wondering journey. By applying a cross-disciplinary approach, Cervantes’ work will be discussed in relation to the artistic and historical context of renaissance and baroque Spain, drawing upon the visual arts and J.H. Elliott’s Imperial Spain, while deconstructing the different kinds of fiction — pastoral, picaresque, the Moorish novel, the Italian novella, and the romance of chivalry — that inhabit this novel.

Attesting to its global reach, Don Quijote has been influential to thinkers from Lukács to Foucault to Bakhtin to Girard to the Frankfurt School, and to writers from Nabokov to Borges to Flaubert to García Márquez and beyond. No other book, with the exception of the Bible, has been translated to more languages, or undergone more editions and reprints. A herald of modernity, Cervantes’ novel casts a vast influence on both Western and Latin American literature.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W 

SPAN 497 – Facts and Myths about learning Spanish

Time: TR, 10:35-11:50 a.m.
Instructor: Manuel Pulido
Course Description: This course focuses on key aspects of the acquisition of Spanish as a second language. The course will address questions such as: Can watching Netflix help me learn Spanish? What type of practice, and how much, can help me learn Spanish? Does the native language change when we learn second languages? Is computer-based learning as effective as face-to-face learning? The course goes from theory to practice, and emphasizes hands-on experience based on examining data and experiments.
Prerequisite: SPAN 215

SPAN 497 – Historical Memory in Recent Spanish Film, Fiction, and Comics

Time: MoWeFr 10:10 AM – 11:00 AM
Instructor: Matthew Marr
Description: This course will examine the concept of historical memory in contemporary Spanish cinema, narrative, and comics. We will consider a stylistically diverse set of cultural productions which have played no small role in catalyzing and informing Spain’s belated, if now vigorous, public reckoning vis-à-vis the full traumas of the Civil War (1936-1939), the ensuing Franco dictatorship (1939-75), and the so-called “Pacto del Olvido” (the Pact of Forgetting) of the transition to democracy.
Prerequisites: (SPAN 100A or SPAN 200) and SPAN 253W

SPAN 497 – How languages are learned

Instructor: Karen Miller
Course Description: What does it mean to be bilingual? (2) How does acquisition of a second language compare to acquisition of a first language? (3) How does bilingualism impact human cognition? (4) What are the social contexts that support language learning and language maintenance? (5) What are the various languages spoken in Spain and Latin America? By answering these questions, this course introduces students to bilingualism in the Spanish-speaking World.

SPAN 497 – Latin(o) American Graphic Novel

Instructor: Marco A. Martínez
Course Description: This interdisciplinary seminar combines literary, visual, and historical approaches to study one of the most rapidly growing and increasingly influential forms of literature: the graphic novel. We will focus on the production made by Latin American and Latinx writers and visual artists, beginning in the late 1990s and continuing to the present day. Through reading, discussion, and presentations, students will develop the literary and visual vocabulary to analyze the conventions and possibilities of the graphic novel. Some of the topics we will be examining are national history, dystopian worlds, migration and racism, literary adaptations, and race, gender and sexuality conceptions. Class will be taught in Spanish.

SPAN 497 – Lyric(s) Culture in Modern Spain & Latin America

Time: TR, 10:35-11:50 a.m.
Instructor: Matthew Marr
Course Description: This course will examine the creative deployment of verse, song, and the lyrical across a diverse range of Spanish and Latin American cultural productions of the modern period, including film, fiction, performance, official propaganda, and social movements.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 497 – Modern Hispanic Short Story

Instructor: Matthew J. Marr
Course Description: This course will offer an in-depth study of the genre of the modern (and, in some instances, postmodern) short story as cultivated—in Spanish—by some of Spain and Latin America’s most vibrant narrative voices of twentieth century through the present.  Primary texts will include selections by, among others, Horacio Quiroga, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Juan Rulfo, Gabriel García Márquez, Camilo José Cela, Ana María Matute, Miguel Delibes, Juan Goytisolo, Rosa Montero, Javier Marías, and Juan José Millás.  Special attention will be given to the mechanics of form and suspense, as well as to an evolving aesthetics of “the real.”  The cultural referents at play in each short story will also be closely examined, as will transatlantic patterns of literary influence and cosmopolitanism (vs. regionalism) among the authors considered.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 497 – No, all Latinos don’t sound the same: Sociolinguistic variation in US Spanish

Instructor: Grant Berry
Course Description: Has a relative confused Puerto Rico with Costa Rica? Do they think every Spanish speaker they hear is from Mexico? Can you tell the difference? Migrant and longstanding Spanish-speaking communities in the US are extremely diverse, and those diverse backgrounds are reflected in the way they use Spanish. Speakers from different geographic regions speak differently, of course, but individuals within the same community also have distinct ways of speaking from one another. This course will explore variations in the Spanish-speaking world as they are observed in Spanish speakers living in the US (e.g., Puerto Ricans in Philadelphia, Spanish speakers in the Southwest, Latinos in New York and Miami), focusing on linguistic variables in the sound system of Spanish (phonology). Geographic patterns of linguistic variation will be identified and examined, and we will explore social factors—age, sex, socioeconomic status, speech style—that influence how those linguistic variables are used in conversation. Although English will be the primary language used in class discussion, required readings will be in both Spanish and English. Advanced intermediate proficiency or higher is strongly recommended.

SPAN 497 – Playing with your mind: What linguists do to find out how humans learn and process language

Instructor: Giulia Togato
Course Description: Language is a vehicle that we use to express our personal and cultural norms and orientations. The whole essence of our thought as individuals is expressed through language. This course will explore the importance that language acquires in social interaction adopting a psycholinguistic approach. Psycholinguistics is the study of the psychological and neurobiological factors that enable humans to acquire, comprehend, process and produce language. Accordingly, the course will offer the possibility to explore the cognitive processes underlying language use (both in comprehension and production: at the lexical, syntactic and discourse level); the main empirical methods psychologists use to approach and analyze language competence will be reviewed. Hence, the main goal of this course will be to understand how the brain makes way for language learning, both for native and non-native languages. The relationship between language, cognition and culture will also be analyzed.  This course integrates traditional lecture classes and student-centered learning (i.e. lecture classes will always be matched with active exercises, both individual and collaborative).
Prerequisite: SPAN 215

SPAN 497 – Representation, Reenactment, and Revolution in Latin America: 1910-present

Time: MWF, 2:30-3:20 p.m.
Instructor: Lily Ryan
Course Description: This course offers a multidisciplinary, multimedia approach that examines incidences of social upheaval that have taken place in Latin America throughout the last century. Using literature, photography, and cinema, it traces how state violence, natural disasters, and political instability have been represented in the Americas, while questioning the critical and geopolitical implications of these representations in the space that we consider to be “Latin America.” These works emanate from a variety of sources that include, but are not limited to, the autobiographical, the historical and the journalistic. We will look at how truth, authority, memory, and fiction give way to our historical understanding of each event. Rather than be all-encompassing, this course examines specific incidents of turmoil and change and combines a historical outlook with analyses of how these events have been represented. In doing so, it serves as a survey course for modern Latin American culture and as an introduction to media studies, as each week’s primary texts will be supplemented with secondary sources on media.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 497 – Spanish in Contact with Other Languages

Instructor: Isabel Deibel
Course Description: This class provides a comprehensive historical, social and linguistic overview of Spanish in contact with other languages in its major contexts – in Spain, the United States, and Latin America.
Prerequisite: SPAN 215

SPAN 497 – Spanish Social-Issue Cinema

Instructor: Matthew J. Marr
Course Description: Since the 1990s, a growing number of filmmakers in Spain have gravitated toward projects concerned with socially charged topics: domestic abuse, terrorism, national memory/amnesia, rural depopulation, immigration, economic malaise, secularization, assisted suicide, disability, etc. In doing so, directors have carved out a heretofore underdeveloped space in a national cinema which, until 1975, saw authoritarian censorship under Franco force directors’ hands with respect to critical openness—and where in the 1980s a flair for art-house experimentation (fueled by the fresh air of democracy) often left real-world issues checked at the cinema door. Yet, just as themes inseparable from a nuanced understanding of contemporary Spanish society have recently moved to the fore of its cinema, so too has the macrogenre of social-issue film diversified in stylistic terms. This course will explore Spanish social-issue cinema through a close analysis of several feature films, documentaries, shorts, frequent theoretical readings, and assignments designed to develop students’ skills as critical viewers.

SPAN 497 – Studying Language through Texts: Introduction to Corpus Linguistics

Time: MoWeFr 11:15 AM – 12:05 PM
Instructor: Carlos Echeverría
Description: Corpus linguistics is the discipline that studies language using real texts – especially large, electronically available collections of texts, potentially including transcriptions of spoken language – as primary sources of data. Because of the emphasis it places on natural linguistic behavior, quantitative analysis, and the use of computer tools, corpus linguistics can be useful to professionals in a wide variety of fields besides linguistics: education, psychology, communication sciences and disorders, computer science, data science, etc. This course offers an introduction to the discipline from the perspective of Spanish and focusing on the use of freely available computer tools. By the end of the course, students will be familiar with the foundations and methods of corpus linguistics and will be able to build their own corpora and conduct basic corpus analyses
Prerequisites: SPAN 215

SPAN 497 – The ABCs of Bilingualism: Acquisition, Brain and Community

Instructor: Lauren Halberstadt
Course Description: Around the world, speaking more than one language is the norm. Have you ever considered what it takes to learn a second language? How the brain manages to juggle two languages in one mind? How communities work and live together while speaking two languages? This course will explore bilingualism, the ability to speak and understand two languages. We’ll discover how bilinguals acquire their languages and how they live with them through the lens of bilingual communities.

SPAN 497 – The Many Faces of Early Modern and Modern Hispanic Culture.

Time: MWF,1:25-2:15 p.m.
Instructor:
 Mary Barnard
Course Description: This is an interactive course that examines works of literature and art within aesthetic, social, and political contexts in early modern (sixteenth century) and modern Spain. It will study early modern cross-cultural excursions into Africa, Italy, and the American colonies and modern topics dealing with the Spanish Civil War, feminism, and the culture of the Roma. Three films will be included, Tierra y libertad (Land and Freedom-director: Ken Loach; Diarios de motocicleta(director: Walter Salles), and Un chien andalou (An Andalusian Dog, director: Luis Buñuel, script by Buñuel and Salvador Dalí).  Works of art by Pablo Picasso, Salvador Dalí, and Frida Kahlo will be included.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 497 – The Many Faces of Modern Hispanic Culture

Time: MoWeFr 1:25 PM – 2:15 PM
Instructor: Mary Barnard
Description: This course deals with multiple manifestations of Spanish and Hispanic-American contemporary culture in canonical and non-canonical poetic texts, works of art, and film. They will be analyzed within their social, political, and historical contexts. It will cover diverse topics, including the Spanish Civil War, the Cuban Revolution, Spanish colonialism in the Caribbean, neocolonialism, feminism, the culture of the gypsy, and slavery and its connections with the Atlantic slave trade during the Spanish conquest and its consequences for modern Caribbean poets. The course will include the political and social repercussions of Negritude and Negrismo in the literary production of Afro-Hispanic poets and their interconnections with Marxism and socialism. The poets we will study include Antonio Machado, Nicolás Guillén, Luis Palés Matos, Pablo Neruda, José Martí, Federico García Lorca, Delmira Agustini, Julia de Burgos, and Nancy Morejón. The course will cover artists such as Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, Pablo Picasso, and Salvador Dalí. The films will include Diarios de Motocicleta (Walter Salles) and Un chien andalou (Luis Buñuel).
Prerequisites: (SPAN 100A or SPAN 200) and SPAN 253W

SPAN 497 – The Spanish your teachers never told you about.

Time: MoWeFr, 1:25-2:15 p.m.
Instructor: Matthew Carlson
Course Description: Have you ever failed to understand someone because they didn’t use the word “whom” properly? There is often quite a difference between how one is “supposed to” use a language, and how the language is actually used in the world. Where does this difference come from? Why are some ways of speaking considered to be more correct, more logical, or more polite, and others are disdained, discouraged, or ridiculed? More importantly, how do these judgments spread, and what are their consequences? Our focus in this course will be on stigmatized varieties of Spanish. Through that focus, we will explore why languages vary and change, why some forms come to be considered wrong or just plain bad, who uses these forms and why, and how people come to be judged, profiled, and discriminated against on the basis of how they speak. A central aspect of this course will be the exploration of primary data, both to study how Spanish is spoken by different people in different places, and to discover what different people say about varieties of Spanish, and about those who use those varieties.
Prerequisite: SPAN 215

SPAN 497 – Voices from the Margin: The Poetry and Drama of Federico García Lorca

Instructor: Mary E. Barnard
Course Description: Poet, playwright, musician, and friend of artists, poets and bullfighters–privileged figures that were outcasts, figures on the margins of society. This course will focus on several of these figures in his poetry and drama, placing them within historical, political, and social contexts, including Lorca’s own controversial presence in the years leading to the Civil War (1936-39): the gypsy as rebel, brawling with his own kind and confronting his enemy, the Civil Guard, in the Romancero gitano; the woman who rebels against the tribal rituals and misguided codes of conduct of a provincial town in the rural tragedy La casa de Bernarda Alba; the black from Harlem in the surrealist Poeta en Nueva York; the noble, bloodied bullfighter in the elegiac Llanto por Ignacio Sánchez Mejías. To address questions of theater and drama in relation to social issues, the students will perform scenes (time permitting) La casa de Bernarda Alba and watch and discuss a film production of this play. The course will also include Lorca’s sketch art and musical scores, and the relation of his works to those of his artist friend Salvador Dalí. The course will include a film about Lorca’s life and works, including his mysterious death at the hands of the Nationalists, The Spirit of Lorca (Michael Dibb, 1986).

SPAN 497 (Section 1) – ABCs of Bilingualism: Acquisition, Brain, and Community

Time: MoWeFr, 10:10-11:00 a.m.
Instructor: Lauren Halberstadt
Course Description: Around the world, the ability to speak more than one language is the norm. However, bilingualism can take on many forms. Throughout the course, we will adapt a broad understanding of bilingualism and what it means to be a bilingual speaker. We will examine how multiple languages are learned, how the brain deals with multiple languages, and who are these bilingual speakers.
Course Objectives:
a. Develop an understanding of the theories surrounding the study of bilingualism.
b. Situate our understanding within the scope of specific communities.
c. Apply what we know about linguistics to new bilingual communities.
Prerequisite: SPAN 215

SPAN 497 (Section 2) – Modern Hispanic Short Story

Time: MoWeFr, 2:30-3:20 p.m.
Instructor: Matthew Marr
Course Description: This course will offer an in-depth study of the genre of the modern/contemporary short story as cultivated in Spanish by some of Spain and Latin America’s most vibrant narrative voices of the twentieth century through the present.  Primary texts will include selections by, among others, Horacio Quiroga, Jorge Luis Borges, Julio Cortázar, Juan Rulfo, Rosario Castellanos, Rosario Ferré, Roberto Bolaño, Ana María Matute, Miguel Delibes, Rosa Montero, Javier Marías, Juan José Millás, and Javier Cercas.  Special attention will be given to the mechanics of form and suspense, an evolving aesthetics of “the real,” engagement with social critique, and short narrative’s commentary on the (post)modern human condition. The cultural referents at play in each text will also be closely examined, as will transatlantic patterns of literary influence and cosmopolitanism (vs. regionalism) among the authors considered.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 497 (Section 3) – Cultural Trends in Contemporary Spain and Hispanic America

Time: MoWeFr, 12:20-1:10 p.m.
Instructor: Mary Barnard
Course Description: This course explores literary texts, art works, and films from twentieth-century Spain and Hispanic America and the cultural currents that subtend their production.  It will study the Industrial Revolution and reactions by modernist writers; colonialism and neocolonialism; slavery and questions of race and hybridity; transatlantic crossing of people and ideas that nourish new ways of thinking and new ways of knowing; material culture, with discursive objects and artefacts serving as carriers of culture and bearers of identity; the African roots of Caribbean poetry; and the plight of minorities, women and gypsies, in Spanish society. Films by Pedro Almodóvar and Alejandro González Iñárritu will be included.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 497 (Section 4) – La vida es sueño and Calderón de la Barca’s Theatre: Performing a Symbolic World

Time: TR, 12:05-1:20 p.m.
Instructor: Juan Udaondo Alegre
Course Description: De acuerdo con la mayoría de especialistas, La vida es sueño es la mejor obra de teatro de la literatura española del Siglo de Oro, de manera parecida a Hamlet entre las letras inglesas. Como podremos comprobar durante los primeros días de clase, en La vida es sueño la belleza de los versos no está reñida con la profundidad filosófica, la complejidad de los personajes y una trama casi perfecta; de hecho, todos ellos son rasgos que  Calderón de la Barca desarrollaría en el resto de su producción, una significativa selección de la cual examinaremos durante el resto del cuatrimestre, incluyendo piezas como El alcalde de Zalamea, El médico de su honra, Amar después de la muerte, El gran teatro del mundo, El príncipe constante, etc. En el análisis de las obras, además de contextualizar y estudiar los temas principales se insistirá especialmente en dos cosas: en primer lugar, su condición de teatro en verso, y cómo Calderón hizo que su poesía reflejase todas las tendencias del Siglo de Oro, desde el Romancero a Góngora pasando por Garcilaso y Lope; en segundo lugar, que estamos leyendo obras escritas primero para ser representadas y después leídas. Por ello, en todas las clases abordaremos tanto el análisis del texto dramático (personajes, conflictos, acotaciones, etc.) como poético (incluyendo métrica, verso y recursos retórico-expresivos). Además, y teniendo en cuenta que las mejores compañías de teatro de España y Latinoamérica han apreciado y representado los textos de Calderón, durante las clases veremos fragmentos en escena de las obras que estamos leyendo, y discutiremos cómo los profesionales del teatro se han acercado al mundo simbólico y la variedad dramática de este autor.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 497 (Section 5) – Spanish for Business and International Trade II

Time: MoWeFr, 11:15 a.m.-12:05 p.m.
Instructor: Melanie Archangeli
Course Description: Spanish for Business and International Trade II, is a continuation of Span 420, Spanish for Business and International Trade.  Thus, Spanish 420 is a prerequisite for Spanish 497-005.   Participants will continue to broaden and deepen their ability to apply their Spanish skills (reading, writing, listening, speaking, and cultural knowledge) in a professional setting by using what they have learned in Spanish 420 to read, analyze, and discuss current articles and case studies related to business issues and companies in various Hispanic countries; examine the intersection of business and culture in the Spanish-speaking world; view current news/business videos in Spanish; and participate in other written and oral activities such as conducting a business meeting and presenting a project focused on their particular major.
Prerequisite: SPAN 420

SPAN 497A – Contemporary Latin American Cinema

Course Description: This course explores Latin American cultures through the study of films of the past quarter of a century.

SPAN 497A – Cuba and Jose Marti

Course Description: The writings and thoughts of Jose Marti have been foundational for Cuba’s literary, political, and cultural expressions and educational institutions before and after the Cuban Revolution (1959). This course will expose students to those writings and ideas from the point of view of post-revolutionary Cuba. Students will be able to compare what they learn in Cuba with other writings and ideas about Marti, related to Latin American in general, ideas on government, society, freedom and independence. During the two weeks in Cuba, Penn State students will be able to learn from different lectures and classes given by university professors and researchers on different aspects of Marti’s life and thoughts. They also will be able to participate in Cuba’s celebration, May 2015, of Marti’s 125th commemoration of his death (1895).  
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 497A – Ink and Gunpowder: Detention and Interpretation in Spanish and Spanish American Detective Short Stories

Course Description: The goal of this undergraduate course is to give students the theoretical grounding to analyze detective texts, and to introduce them to major trends in Spanish and Spanish-American detective fictions. By reading a collection of short stories, which adopt and adapt different elements of the genre (the criminal, the law, the motivation, the investigation, etc.) we will examine how several Spanish and Spanish American writers use the crime model as a pre- text and a pretext to undergo social criticism, self-inquiry and meta- fictional questionings that expand the scope of the classical whodunit.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W

SPAN 497B – How Languages are Learned

Course Description: (1) How do humans learn additional languages after they have learned their first language? (2) How does bilingual language development compare to monolingual language development? (3) Why do we find variability in rates and outcomes of second language acquisiton? (4) What does it take to acquire advanced language skills in a second language? By answering these questions, this course introduces students to the field of first, second, and bilingual language acquisition.
Prerequisite: SPAN 215

SPAN 497B – Women in the Contemporary Spanish-speaking World: Literature and Films

Course Description: This course explores the contributions of women throughout the Spanish- speaking world to contemporary literature and film, so as to deepen the understanding of its complex and rich cultures.

SPAN 497C – Avant-Garde Primitivisms

Course Description: In this course we will explore the ways in which the tension between the drive for futurity and the appeal of the “primitive” plays out in the visual art, poetry, prose, theater, and films of Latin American and European artists commonly regarded as “avant-garde.”
Prerequisite: SPAN 200 and SPAN 253W

SPAN 497C – Living Breathing Language

Course Description: There are nearly 7000 language spoken in the world today. Where did they come from? What makes them different? How are they similar? What happens when they die? This course will explore linguistic diversity, historical change and dialectal variation through the lens of evolutionary biology. Using examples from Spanish, both modern and historical, we will learn how language can be characterized as a living, growing, changing organism.
Prerequisite: SPAN 215

SPAN 497D – How Languages are Learned

Course Description: (1) how do humans learn additional languages after they have learned their first langauge? (2) How does bilingual language development compare to monolingual language development? (3) Why do we find variability in rates and outcomes of second language acquisition? (4) What does it take to acquire advanced language skills in a second language? By answering these questions, this course introduces students to the field of first, second, and bilingual language acquisition.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200 and SPAN 215

SPAN 497E – The Social Life of Spanish Phonetics

Course Description: This course focuses on variation in Spanish phonetics and phonology causes by dialectal differences and other social factors (age, gender, socioeconomic status, identity). In this course you will also learn how to conduct your own research experiment to investigate the influence of these factors on pronunciation.
Prerequisite: SPAN 200 and SPAN 215

SPAN 497F – Idiomatic Expressions and Regionalism Across the Spanish-speaking World

Course Description: The student will study the different idiomatic expressions from Latin America and Spain, using short-stories, articles, and interviews as a main source. Students will write an essay based on their research.  
Prerequisite: SPAN 001, SPAN 002, SPAN 003, SPAN 200

SPAN/LTNST 315N – Spanish and Spanish-speakers in the U.S. (3 credits)

Course Description: In this course, we investigate various aspects of the language(s) and language behaviors of U.S. Latinos. The course is premised on the idea that language is a crucial component in the formation of identity. To understand Latina/o identity formation in the U.S., then, one must analyze what role languages–Spanish and English–have played in identity formation. The class commences with a brief historical assessment of the various U.S. Latino communities, including Mexican-American, Cuban-American, and Puerto Rican communities. Such a historical purview proves significant in the study of the cultural traditions that persist in these communities, chief among these, the Spanish language. In exploring the Spanish language in U.S. Latino communities, we consider several major sets of questions, among them the following: In what ways do the languages of U.S. Latino communities differ from those of monolingual Spanish- (and English-) speaking communities? What factors contribute to the maintenance and loss of Spanish in these communities? How does language contribute to the creation of individual and societal identity? How is language exploited in the representation of other U.S. Latino cultural traditions? We consider these questions across a variety of genres: poetry, prose (autobiography in particular), film, art, television, and music. These texts reveal how social environments determine language use as well as how artists have used language to reshape social environments, through, for example, the development of new language practices such as Spanish-English code switching. The course also connects these cultural practices to debates on Spanish in public life and policy.
Prerequisite: None

SPAN/LTNST 479 – U.S. Latina/o Culture en Español (3 credits)

Course Description: This course is conducted in Spanish and will analyze some of the central themes that shape the diverse Latina/o experiences in the United States. Some of the main topics that the course will address include: the politics of labeling; definitions of displacements; the politics of language; imaginary homelands and geographic spaces; and conceptualizations of race, gender, and sexuality. These themes will be seen through the lens of Latina/o literature and film. The main objective of this course is to help students think critically about the conceptual, theoretical, historical, and social issues that inform the Latina/o experience in the United States.
Prerequisite: SPAN 253W