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Spring 2018

PORT 497 (Fulfills Other Cultures Requirement) (also SPAN 497)

TR 12:05-1:20
Prof. Sarah J. Townsend

Through the Looking-Glass: Race in the United States and Brazil: This course offers a comparative study of the political and cultural dimensions of race in the United States and Brazil. Among the topics we will discuss are constructions of the "Indian," similarities and differences in the systems of slavery, Jim Crow versus the Brazilian myth of racial democracy, the influence of funk and rap in Brazilian music, and cases of collaboration between African-American and Afro-Brazilian activists. Materials will include historical and political writings as well as films, literature, and music. The class will be taught in English. Students can receive credit for either the Portuguese minor. 


Fall 2017

PORT 197

MWF 12:20-1:10
Prof. Sarah J. Townsend

Portuguese for Romance Language Speakers: This course offers an introduction to Brazilian Portuguese for students who already have a good grasp of grammar and vocabulary in Spanish, French, Italian, or Latin. By the end of the semester students should be able to read most literary and non-literary texts (with the occasional aid of a dictionary) and carry on a simple conversation in Portuguese. Due to the intensive nature of the course our focus will be on acquiring linguistic fluency, but along the way we will also gain insight into certain aspects of Brazilian culture through our analysis of song lyrics, journalistic texts, and TV shows.

PORT 497

MWF 1:25-2:15
Prof.
Krista Brune

Race and Gender in Contemporary Luso-Brazilian Cinema: By examining feature films and documentaries from the past two decades, the class explores how cinema approaches social, cultural, political, and economic realities of race and gender in Brazil, Portugal, Angola, and Mozambique. Our viewings and readings will lead us to address how histories of imperialism, colonialism, dictatorial regimes, and racial injustices emerge as thematic concerns in contemporary film. We also examine convergences and divergences between different parts of the Portuguese-speaking world and, in turn, consider the possibilities and limitations of studying these works in a comparative Lusophone framework. Secondary readings on film, history, and contemporary Lusophone culture, and interviews with filmmakers will complement our studies. This course will be taught in English. Students pursuing the Portuguese minor may count this course toward their requirements if they write their papers in Portuguese.  


Spring 2017

PORT 397

TR 1:35-2:50
Prof. Sarah Townsend

The International Amazon: The Amazon is sometimes imagined as a primeval place located outside history. Yet for several centuries (if not longer) it has been a site of exploration and exploitation by foreigners, and ever since the rubber boom of the late nineteenth century it has been closely integrated into the international economy. This course will focus on the Brazilian Amazon as a site of international capital investment and cultural exchange through film, literature, music, and historical accounts.


Fall 2016

PORT 197 

MWF 3:35-4:25
Prof.
Krista Brune

Portuguese for Romance Language Speakers: This course offers an introduction to Brazilian Portuguese for students who already have a good grasp of grammar and vocabulary in Spanish, French, Italian, or Latin. By the end of the semester students should be able to read most literary and non-literary texts (with the occasional aid of a dictionary) and carry on a simple conversation in Portuguese. Due to the intensive nature of the course our focus will be on acquiring linguistic fluency, but along the way we will also gain insight into certain aspects of Brazilian culture through our analysis of song lyrics, journalistic texts, and TV shows.